Oh hey, the fridge is stocked and ready for ya! Open house tomorrow 3-7pm, 209 W Ohio St #chicago #nostigmas #party (at NoStigmas)

Oh hey, the fridge is stocked and ready for ya! Open house tomorrow 3-7pm, 209 W Ohio St #chicago #nostigmas #party (at NoStigmas)

Proud of @talkingtocactus and her Intern Summit presentation at #OFAction!

Proud of @talkingtocactus and her Intern Summit presentation at #OFAction!

Tags: ofaction

Open House: Join us for refreshments! Wed. July 16th, 3PM - 7PM | 209 W Ohio St, Ste. 200, Chicago (at NoStigmas)

Open House: Join us for refreshments! Wed. July 16th, 3PM - 7PM | 209 W Ohio St, Ste. 200, Chicago (at NoStigmas)

Doughnuts help improve #mentalhealth right? :) (at NoStigmas)

Doughnuts help improve #mentalhealth right? :) (at NoStigmas)

Sign up for updates and we’ll send you some stickers and other fun stuff! nostigmas.org/updates #mentalhealth #takeaction #getinvolved #teamnostigmas (at NoStigmas Center)

Sign up for updates and we’ll send you some stickers and other fun stuff! nostigmas.org/updates #mentalhealth #takeaction #getinvolved #teamnostigmas (at NoStigmas Center)

Affirmation from our friend @meganroc #yoga #justbe

Affirmation from our friend @meganroc #yoga #justbe

Today is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Awareness Day

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By Amanda Reimer

Imagine you’re going about your day—maybe you’re walking in the park with a friend. Suddenly you’re reliving your worst memories, fearful for your life.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder can affect anyone. Though stereotypes will say PTSD is caused by war, there are many other causes ranging from sexual assault, to a severe injury, to the threat of death.

Like its name says, PTSD can occur after anything traumatic. Nowadays, PTSD is even becoming common in children, as the number of school shootings elevates.

But the good news is that there are ways to cope with PTSD. In addition to the well-known therapy and medication options, there are many other resources for recovery and treatment.

For some, like Iraq veteran Roque Rodriguez-Urena, they find it in exercise. Exercise not only allows patients to get moving, but also releases endorphins that help improve moods.

Iraq veteran with PTSD finds healing in exercise

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In fact, Mental Health America recommends exercise as part of a self-care routine for PTSD patients to help improve sleep and relieve muscle tension and anxiety.

Others have found more creative recovery devices for PTSD from journaling to therapy dogs—the latter, which is becoming more common.

Therapy dogs can help by providing companionship and calming their owners, as well as by preventing crowds of people from moving too closely or quickly around their owner.

How dogs can help veterans overcome PTSD

So, what can you do to help bring awareness to PTSD? The National Center for PTSD says the first step is to learn. Those wishing to learn more about PTSD can participate in the National Center for PTSD’s online PTSD 101 course, or other free in-depth professional courses.

From there, the next step is to reach out and share. June is a great time to connect because it is PTSD awareness month, but there are people looking for connections on any given day.

    PTSD can feel like a living nightmare, but no one has to face it alone. It’s time to stand together.  

    Please visit nostigmas.org/anxiety-disorders to learn more about PTSD and other anxiety disorders.  

PTSD can affect anyone, but no one has to face it alone.
#notalone #mentalhealth #PTSDawarenessday

PTSD can affect anyone, but no one has to face it alone.

#notalone #mentalhealth #PTSDawarenessday

Thanks to your amazing support, we raised $8,738 and finished 18th of 55 for the @ArtVanFurniture Charity Challenge!

Thanks to your amazing support, we raised $8,738 and finished 18th of 55 for the @ArtVanFurniture Charity Challenge!

Sharing Stories

Written by Caitlyn P

When I was little, my mom would read me stories before I went to bed, but my favorite nights were the ones when she would make up her own stories and tell them to me, about a little girl with my name who went on adventures with mermaids or bears or her team of stuffed animals. Those stories were created for me and kept by me, but what I really remember now is the experience of being a listener.

Humans are natural storytellers. Since early civilizations, people have sat around fires and tell each other stories about how the world was formed, where humans came from, and what their purpose was in the world. In many ways, we still do this today. And the reason we tell stories today is perhaps the same reason we’ve always told stories. Whether it’s a quick sentence summarizing an experience or a full-blown retelling of an incident, there’s something very human in the act of sharing a story with another person.

When we tell a story, as well as when we listen to one, we are engaging in a sort of connection with one or two or several other people. In an article about the importance of stories, Dr. Kirsti A. Dyer points out that storytelling is one of the oldest healing arts, practiced by grieving individuals to cope with loss or illness, and that stories told by others can provide hope.

Media Psychologist Dr. Pamela Rutledge, in an article on the psychology of storytelling, points to evidence that storytelling helps us get in touch with a deeper part of ourselves and, through mythology and symbolism, broadens our understanding of universal truths and patterns in the way we experience life.

Dyer also says that stories can also inspire others to share their own experiences. The thing about experience is that, as humans, we all see and feel and know things that we can show to others through the stories we tell them, and even if the listener has never seen or felt or known those same things, they will be able to connect to at least a small part of what is being told to them. And isn’t connection what we’re all looking for?

Some days, when I realize how fast life moves us from one story to the next, I’m hit with a wave of nostalgia for the made-up stories my mom used to tell me, mainly those shared moments that make up a part of the history of who I am and who I am becoming. I have more experiences now, and more of my own stories—tales of grief, of hope, of the patterns in human life. And partly because I’m a writer, but also partly because I’m just human, I share them.